kqedscience
kqedscience:

Three 16 Year Old Girls Win Top Prize At Google Science Fair For Agricultural Research
“The Grand Prize went to a team of three 16-year-old girls from Ireland: Ciara Judge, Émer Hickey, and Sophie Healy-Thow. Their project, “Combating The Global Food Crisis: Diazotroph Bacteria As A Cereal Crop Growth Promoter,” explored different bacterial strains that could shorten the germination time of cereal crops like oats and barley. Growing food is becoming monumentally important, as climate change threatens food crops, and the increasing global population is becoming incredibly demanding.”
Learn more from IFLScience!

kqedscience:

Three 16 Year Old Girls Win Top Prize At Google Science Fair For Agricultural Research

The Grand Prize went to a team of three 16-year-old girls from Ireland: Ciara Judge, Émer Hickey, and Sophie Healy-Thow. Their project, “Combating The Global Food Crisis: Diazotroph Bacteria As A Cereal Crop Growth Promoter,” explored different bacterial strains that could shorten the germination time of cereal crops like oats and barley. Growing food is becoming monumentally important, as climate change threatens food crops, and the increasing global population is becoming incredibly demanding.”

Learn more from IFLScience!

astronomy-to-zoology
astronomy-to-zoology:

Lumbricus badensis
…is a species of giant Lumbricid earthworm, which is endemic to the upper-elevation spruce forests of Germany’s Black Forest. Reaching lengths of around 60 cm (24.6) in length L. badensis is one of the largest European species of earthworm. Like other smaller earthworms Lumbricus badensis tunnels underground (typically 2.5 m (8 ft) deep) and feeds on organic matter, aerating the soil and contributing to the formation of humus as it moves. 
Classification
Animalia-Annelida-Clitellata-Oligochaeta-Haplotaxida-Lumbricidae-Lumbricus-L. badensis
Image: Naturschutzzentrum Südschwarzwald

astronomy-to-zoology:

Lumbricus badensis

…is a species of giant Lumbricid earthworm, which is endemic to the upper-elevation spruce forests of Germany’s Black Forest. Reaching lengths of around 60 cm (24.6) in length L. badensis is one of the largest European species of earthworm. Like other smaller earthworms Lumbricus badensis tunnels underground (typically 2.5 m (8 ft) deep) and feeds on organic matter, aerating the soil and contributing to the formation of humus as it moves. 

Classification

Animalia-Annelida-Clitellata-Oligochaeta-Haplotaxida-Lumbricidae-Lumbricus-L. badensis

Image: Naturschutzzentrum Südschwarzwald

medicalschool

medicalschool:

During an infection, viruses spread from infected to uninfected cells and can be spread cell-to-cell. Here, murine leukemia virus undergoes cell-to-cell transmission via filopodial bridges to physically link the two cells.

Image: Cos-1 cells generating murine leukemia virus (MLV) expressing Gag-YFP (red) were co-cultured with uninfected XC target cells expressing the MLV receptor mCAT-1-CFP (green) and imaged using time-lapse fluorescence microscopy. Images were taken approximately every 2 minutes and compiled in a time-lapse movie. Learn more in Sherer et al.(2007) and Jin et al. (2009).

currentsinbiology
bbsrc:

For the first time flowering plants have been successfully engineered to fix carbon like the blue-green algae do – this can potentially increase photosynthesis and yields in crop plants.
Plants, algae and some bacteria capture light energy from the sun and transform it into chemical energy by the process named photosynthesis. Blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) have a more efficient mechanism in carrying out photosynthesis than plants. For a long time now, it has been suggested that if plants could carry out photosynthesis with a similar mechanism to that of the blue-green algae, plant productivity and hence crop yields could improve.
Rothamsted Research scientists strategically funded by the BBSRC and in collaboration with colleagues at Cornell University funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation have used genetic engineering of tobacco plants - a tobacco plant can been seen above - to demonstrate for the first time that flowering plants can carry out photosynthesis utilizing a faster bacterial Rubisco enzyme rather than their own slower Rubisco enzyme. These findings represent a milestone toward the goal of improving the photosynthetic rate in crop plants.
Copyright: Rothamsted Research
Read more on this story: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/food-security/2014/140917-pr-big-step-towards-efficient-photosynthesis.aspx

bbsrc:

For the first time flowering plants have been successfully engineered to fix carbon like the blue-green algae do – this can potentially increase photosynthesis and yields in crop plants.

Plants, algae and some bacteria capture light energy from the sun and transform it into chemical energy by the process named photosynthesis. Blue-green algae (cyanobacteria) have a more efficient mechanism in carrying out photosynthesis than plants. For a long time now, it has been suggested that if plants could carry out photosynthesis with a similar mechanism to that of the blue-green algae, plant productivity and hence crop yields could improve.

Rothamsted Research scientists strategically funded by the BBSRC and in collaboration with colleagues at Cornell University funded by the U.S. National Science Foundation have used genetic engineering of tobacco plants - a tobacco plant can been seen above - to demonstrate for the first time that flowering plants can carry out photosynthesis utilizing a faster bacterial Rubisco enzyme rather than their own slower Rubisco enzyme. These findings represent a milestone toward the goal of improving the photosynthetic rate in crop plants.

Copyright: Rothamsted Research

Read more on this story: http://www.bbsrc.ac.uk/news/food-security/2014/140917-pr-big-step-towards-efficient-photosynthesis.aspx

medicalschool
medicalschool:

Ovary - Corpus Luteum
Histology image shows the ovary in overview, the cortex and medulla of the ovary can be clearly seen.
Corpus luteum (yellow body) theca lutein cells and granulosa lutein cells. These cells work together in the production of ovarian hormones that support the initial pregnancy.
Corpus albicans (white body) lack of implantation and associated hCG will lead to this structure not producing hormones.
Atretic follicles are the degenerating follicles from various developmental stages that did not form the ovulating follicle and do not form the corpus luteum. 

medicalschool:

Ovary - Corpus Luteum

Histology image shows the ovary in overview, the cortex and medulla of the ovary can be clearly seen.

Corpus luteum (yellow body) theca lutein cells and granulosa lutein cells. These cells work together in the production of ovarian hormones that support the initial pregnancy.

Corpus albicans (white body) lack of implantation and associated hCG will lead to this structure not producing hormones.

Atretic follicles are the degenerating follicles from various developmental stages that did not form the ovulating follicle and do not form the corpus luteum. 

astronomy-to-zoology

astronomy-to-zoology:

William’s Dwarf Gecko (Lygodactylus williamsi)

Also known as the turquoise dwarf gecko, or the “electric blue gecko”, William’s dwarf gecko is a critically endangered species of gecko (Gekkonidae) which is endemic to a 8km2 (3 sq miles) area of the Kimboza Forest in eastern Tanzania. William’s dwarf geckos are only known to occur on the (endangered) screwpine Pandanus rabaiensis, where they will feed on insects, and drink nectar/water from its leaves. 

Lygodactylus williamsi is currently listed as Critically Endangered by the IUCN, as it faces major threats from over-collection for the international pet trade, and from the habitat loss/fragmentation of its already small range. 

Classification

Animalia-Chordata-Reptilia-Squamata-Lacertilia-Gekkota-Gekkonidae-Gekkoninae-Lygodactylus-L. williamsi

Images: Esther Bock and WingedWolfPsion

neurosciencestuff
neurosciencestuff:

Device lets docs stay ‘tuned in’ to brain bloodflow
For Dr. John Murkin, the medical device business is all about “making a better mouse trap.”
The Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry professor is part of a team of Western and Lawson Health Research Institute (LHRI) researchers studying a new technology that may change the way patients undergoing cardiac surgery are monitored and managed in the hospital.
The device, known as CerOx, non-invasively monitors cerebral blood flow and helps physicians and nurses assess brain perfusion in real time. Murkin, who has been involved in the machine’s development, said this information could be used to support critical treatment decisions made to protect the patient from potential complications.
“We use near-infrared light routinely in all hospitals to measure oxygen saturation in the brain. That’s been out for 30 years,” Murkin said. “This new device is not just measuring oxygen saturation; it’s also measuring blood flow to the brain, in real time, and non-invasively.
“If a patient has a brain injury, the more you know about the brain, the better you are at being tuned into their needs.”
In cardiac surgery, cerebral monitoring significantly reduces complications, including permanent stroke.
An anesthetist at London Health Sciences Centre and a researcher at LHRI, Murkin has studied cognitive and neurological outcomes in cardiac surgery for more than three decades. He said there has been an unmet clinical need for a noninvasive tool that provides accurate, real-time measurements of cerebral blood flow in these highly vulnerable patients.
Currently, 11 different studies have evaluated CerOx in different applications.
“We’ve seen the potential of the machine and we’re convinced it works,” he added. “If you don’t know what’s going on in the brain, you can’t help. But, when you start to monitor this, and you see changes in blood flow, in oxygen saturation and its because of the blood pressure or hemoglobin, or whatever it is, if you pick things up early enough, you can hopefully avoid any possible complications.
“If you can monitor in real time, you can act in real time.”
The device is expected to be used primarly by physicians in neuro-critical care areas.
“While the device can alert you to potential problems, the next part is what are you going to do about it? You still need to act,” he said. “We want to start looking at what are some of the therapeutic interventions we can use to improve outcomes.”
CerOx was developed by U.S.- and Israel-based Ornim Medical, of which Murkin is a member of their scientific advisory board.

neurosciencestuff:

Device lets docs stay ‘tuned in’ to brain bloodflow

For Dr. John Murkin, the medical device business is all about “making a better mouse trap.”

The Schulich School of Medicine & Dentistry professor is part of a team of Western and Lawson Health Research Institute (LHRI) researchers studying a new technology that may change the way patients undergoing cardiac surgery are monitored and managed in the hospital.

The device, known as CerOx, non-invasively monitors cerebral blood flow and helps physicians and nurses assess brain perfusion in real time. Murkin, who has been involved in the machine’s development, said this information could be used to support critical treatment decisions made to protect the patient from potential complications.

“We use near-infrared light routinely in all hospitals to measure oxygen saturation in the brain. That’s been out for 30 years,” Murkin said. “This new device is not just measuring oxygen saturation; it’s also measuring blood flow to the brain, in real time, and non-invasively.

“If a patient has a brain injury, the more you know about the brain, the better you are at being tuned into their needs.”

In cardiac surgery, cerebral monitoring significantly reduces complications, including permanent stroke.

An anesthetist at London Health Sciences Centre and a researcher at LHRI, Murkin has studied cognitive and neurological outcomes in cardiac surgery for more than three decades. He said there has been an unmet clinical need for a noninvasive tool that provides accurate, real-time measurements of cerebral blood flow in these highly vulnerable patients.

Currently, 11 different studies have evaluated CerOx in different applications.

“We’ve seen the potential of the machine and we’re convinced it works,” he added. “If you don’t know what’s going on in the brain, you can’t help. But, when you start to monitor this, and you see changes in blood flow, in oxygen saturation and its because of the blood pressure or hemoglobin, or whatever it is, if you pick things up early enough, you can hopefully avoid any possible complications.

“If you can monitor in real time, you can act in real time.”

The device is expected to be used primarly by physicians in neuro-critical care areas.

“While the device can alert you to potential problems, the next part is what are you going to do about it? You still need to act,” he said. “We want to start looking at what are some of the therapeutic interventions we can use to improve outcomes.”

CerOx was developed by U.S.- and Israel-based Ornim Medical, of which Murkin is a member of their scientific advisory board.